Onomatopoeia

Onomatopœia (/ˌɒnəˌmætəˈpiːə, -ˌmɑː-/ (listen); from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία; ὄνομα for "name" and ποιέω for "I make", adjectival form: "onomatopœic" or "onomatopœtic") is the process of creating a word that phonetically imitates, resembles, or suggests the sound that it describes. As such words are uncountable nouns, onomatopoeia refers to the property of such words. Common occurrences of words of the onomatopoeia process include animal noises such as "oink", "miaow" (or "meow"), "roar" and "chirp". Onomatopoeia can differ between languages: it conforms to some extent to the broader linguistic system; hence the sound of a clock may be expressed as tick tock in English, tic tac in Spanish and Italian, dī dā in Mandarin, katchin katchin in Japanese, or "tik-tik" in Hindi. Although in the English language the term onomatopœia means 'the imitation of a sound', the compound word onomatopœia (ὀνοματοποιία) in the Greek language means 'making or creating names'. For words that imitate sounds, the term ὴχομιμητικό (echomimetico) or echomimetic) is used. The word ὴχομιμητικό (echomimetico) derives from "ὴχώ", meaning 'echo' or 'sound', and "μιμητικό", meaning 'mimetic' or 'imitating'.

Words

This table shows the example usage of word lists for keywords extraction from the text above.

WordWord FrequencyNumber of ArticlesRelevance
onomatopœia410.272
onomatopoeia41200.188
echomimetico210.136
ὴχομιμητικό210.136
ὀνοματοποιία210.136

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more. Got it.