Allele

An allele (/əˈliːl/) is a variant form of a given gene. Sometimes, the presence of different alleles of the same gene can result in different observable phenotypic traits, such as different pigmentation. A notable example of this trait of color variation is Gregor Mendel's discovery that the white and purple flower colors in pea plants were the result of "pure line" traits which could be used as a control for future experiments. However, most genetic variations result in little or no observable variation. Most multicellular organisms have two sets of chromosomes; that is, they are diploid. In this case the chromosomes can be paired: each pair is made up of two chromosomes of the same type, known as homologous chromosomes. If both alleles at a gene (or locus) on the homologous chromosomes are the same, they and the organism are homozygous with respect to that gene (or locus). If the alleles are different, they and the organism are heterozygous with respect to that gene.

Words

This table shows the example usage of word lists for keywords extraction from the text above.

WordWord FrequencyNumber of ArticlesRelevance
chromosomes57600.247
alleles42860.219
allele33220.163
gene5231620.152
observable26280.101

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more. Got it.